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The Fumoto Engine Oil Drain Valve

A better mouse trap

by Julian Edgar

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Like most enthusiasts, you probably change your own engine oil. You know, steal a bucket out of the laundry, wriggle under the car and undo the sump plug. The plug'll then fall into the bucket while hot oil splashes everywhere. And then you gotta do the oil filter.

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We can't offer any help with the filter but the oil-everywhere mess of oil changes can be gone forever with this handy device. What is it then? It's a tap that screws into the sump, replacing the sump-plug and making it a heck of a lot easier to change the oil. Or to even just drain a small amount for analysis - yes, if you run a high performance car where you analyse the oil for signs of excessive engine wear or oil breakdown, taking those samples just got ridiculously easy.

The Valve

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The Engine Oil Drain Valve is Japanese-made and US patented. It uses a high quality forged brass body and stainless steel internal ball valve. To prevent the valve being inadvertently opened, a 'lift and turn' action is required.

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The Australian distributor provided us with the cutaway valve shown here - the construction quality looks excellent. The manufacturer claims genuine parts status with Nissan, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Isuzu.

Fitting

Fitting the valve is dead simple - in fact, if it is done when you are doing a normal oil change, it takes no extra time at all.

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First up, you undo the sump plug...

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...and drain the oil.

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Then you screw in the drain valve, which has an identical thread to the sump plug. In some cases, as with the BMW 735i shown here, an extension adaptor is needed to provide adequate clearance (ie, if the sump plug is recessed, you'll need an extension.) Care should be taken that the valve is not over-tightened.

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Fill the engine with oil and then whenever you want to drain it or take a sample, lift and turn the lever.

Versions

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The valve comes in different versions to suit different engines, with the vast majority of cars on the market catered for. In addition, the valve can be bought with or without a hose nipple. Here, the valve on the left has a nipple. This allows the easy attachment of a hose, making the possibility of splashes of oil going onto the garage floor (or your skin!) nearly zero.

Conclusion

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We think that the Engine Oil Drain Valve is an excellent product. The sealing appears leakproof, the two-step tap opening is likely to be very reliable (for off-road applications a hose clamp can be added which would make inadvertent opening impossible), and the convenience of use indisputable.

The Fumoto Engine Oil Drain Valve range is available in the AutoSpeed Shop.

Contact: Peter Caetano
Maxtech Technology
Phone +61 413 073 111

maxtech@tpg.com.au

The oil drain valve was supplied free to AutoSpeed for this review.

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